New Year’s Day Levée

levee

On New Year’s Day my husband and I attended the Lieutenant Governor’s New Year Levée, held at the Manitoba Legislative Building. I knew it was an annual event, one of those things I told myself that we should attend…someday.  Since 2017 is a special year, the celebration of 150 years since Confederation, I decided that this would be the year.

According to news reports, about 1300 people attended this year’s celebration, and judging by the number of cars parked in the area, that seems about right.

I stood in line to shake Lieutenant Governor Janice Filmon’s hand, as well as other dignitaries. Fruitcake, cookies and punch were served.  Musical entertainment was provided. I came away with a Canada 150 flag and pin, as pictured above.

A levée is a reception held “to mark the advent of another year and to provide an opportunity for the public to pay their respects.” You can read more about the levée here.

The tradition of a New Year Levée has a long history in Canada. The first recorded one was hosted in 1646 by the Governor of New France, Charles Huault de Montmagny, in the Château St. Louis in Quebec City.

chateau_saint-louis

Château St. Louis From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository

 

We have many ancestors that were in the Quebec City area in 1646 and may have attended the Levée.  There is no way to know for sure, but perhaps these ancestors  paid their respects to the Governor: Abraham Martin, Olivier le Tardif, Jean Guyon , Zacharie Cloutier, Robert Drouin. You’ll notice that these are all men, as women were not ALLOWED to attend until World War II, when female members of the Armed Forces were permitted to join the event!

On the wonderful website Manitobia, I found a description of the Manitoba Levée of 1873.

capture

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Again, we can’t know if any of our ancestors and relations were in attendance.  However, the Mr. Beauchemin, MPP (Member of the Provincial Parliament) who is mentioned, would have been Andre Beauchemin, uncle of Jean Baptiste Beauchemin who was married to my great-grandmother Philomene McMillan’s sister Marguerite.

During the time of the fur trade, a New Year’s celebration was the custom at the various forts. These seem to have been less subdued occasions. In the book Making the Voyageur World: Travelers and Traders in the North American Fur Trade by Carolyn Podruchny, excerpts of which are available on Google Books here, we learn:

“Feasting, drinking, and levees, or paying courtesy calls on masters (particularly on New Year’s Day), were characteristic of celebrations in fur trade society.”

Undoubtedly James McMillan, John Warren Dease and Amable Hogue would have partaken in these festivities.

I seem to remember my Mother mentioning that in La Salle, it was the custom for families to visit the grandfathers on New Year’s Day.

I enjoyed attending the Lieutenant Governor’s New Year Levée of 2017, and it resulted in a brief moment of “fame”.  That evening on Global News as we watched their coverage of the event, my husband and I walked into the frame!

 

Happy New Year Canada!

2017 is a special year for Canadian history buffs, as it marks 150 years since Confederation.  All sorts of special celebrations are planned throughout the coming year.

You can read about some of the official planned festivities here.

Check here for a database of community and volunteer projects.

Library and Archives Canada will be informing us of a daily “today-in-history vignette highlighting a significant event that shaped our society” at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/onthisday/Pages/introduction.aspx

As the title of blog suggests, and my posts confirm, I am fascinated with the historical and social events that surrounded the lives of our ancestors.  Whether blogging about the first Girardin ancestor, Olivier Le Tardif who was in New France by 1621 (read about him here), our Hogue ancestor James McMillan, Chief Factor with HBC, who traveled with the explorer David Thompson (read his story here), our Napoleonic soldier Jean Baptiste Bernardin, who arrived on our shores via the War of 1812 (his story is here), or the fascinating story of our Metis ancestor, Margaret/Marguerite Taylor, country wife of Sir George Simpson, and the person whose story ignited my passion for genealogy, I remain in awe of the fortitude and courage shown by our ancestors, as they built their lives in this country we call home.

As the festivities of Canada 150 unfold, I hope to share more stories that make up our history.

Happy New Year everyone!

 

 

A childhood Christmas memory

My Dad was a talented home handyman.  When I was a teenager he made me a gigantic desk which I still used until a few years ago when it was damaged by some basement flooding.  I have in my “office” a fifties style bookcase (probably from a Popular Mechanics plan)  that’s crammed with genealogy and history books.  Someone else in the family has the matching desk.

But the item I remember most is the wooden giraffe he made me for the Christmas I was 4 years old.  I remember that for several weeks before Christmas, I was told NOT to venture into the basement of our house at 411 Marjorie.  Being a perfect, obedient child I did as I was told!

On Christmas Day, beside the tree (it was too big to go beneath) was a wooden giraffe that you could sit on, with a chalkboard in front. It was blue with orange spots. I was delighted, the way only a 4 year old can be.

I don’t have a picture of it, but I found this picture which is very similar.  Perhaps adding the chalkboard was Dad’s own idea.

giraffe

When I outgrew the giraffe it was passed over to some cousins.

Merry Christmas to all relatives, friends and readers who take the time to read my musings.

 

Ville-Marie

A newspaper article caught my eye this morning.

“After years of research, officials at Montreal’s archaeology and history museum say they’re now able to pinpoint the precise location of the city’s first European settlement.”

The settlement was known as Ville-Marie and, of course, some of our ancestors were there!  I have blogged about them  before.  See here and here.

You can read more about this discovery at CBC.

 

 

Finding the missing child

Researching ancestors is an ongoing process.  There are always records that elude discovery; people for whom you can never answer the question “what happened to them?” Today I am sharing the story and excitement of finally finding a missing child.

The story began when I first started researching the family of Jean Baptiste Bernardin and his wife Marie Charlotte Taillefer.  I wrote about them here.  A distant relative had shared with me one of the books written by Professor Charles Bernardin, who had done  extensive research many years ago.

One thing about the Professor’s research intrigued me.  According to the Professor, Jean Baptiste Bernardin and his wife Marie Charlotte Taillefer had 12 children, yet my research had uncovered 13 children.  The Professor’s list of children had a 4 year gap in birth dates between 1820 and 1824, which was unusual in French Canada.

I had found baptismal certificates for two sons named Charles.  Charles Michel born in 1823 and Charles Jules born in 1837.

Bernardin Charles Michel b1823 baptism excerpt

Baptism of Charles Michel Bernardin 29 Jan 1823, Nicolet (cathédrale St-Jean-Baptiste) > Drouin Collection

Bernardin Charles Jules b1837 baptism excerpt

Baptism of Charles Jules Bernardin 27 Feb 1837, Nicolet (cathédrale St-Jean-Baptiste) Drouin Collection

For some reason, the Professor’s research had not uncovered the baptismal record of Charles Michel. Therefore, he believed that his direct ancestor was Charles Jules who had married  Victoire Peloquin in 1854. I questioned that since Charles Jules would have been only 17 years old at the time.  I believed that it was Charles Michel, born in 1823, who married  Victoire.

In addition, the Professor had overlooked the fact that his ancestor’s gravestone gave his initial as M. and his birth date as 1823.

Bernardin Charles Michel b1823 Grave St. Mary's Cemetary

St. Mary’s Cemetery, Lawrence, Massachusetts. Picture posted with the kind permission of Charles (Pete) Bernardin

So what ever happened to Charles Jules, the “missing” child? Other than his baptismal record, I had found no trace of him.  Then recently the Professor’s son found my blog and shared some background documents of his Father’s with me.  One of these was an overview of the Bernardin family written in 1936 by Yvonne Bernardin (Sister St. Lucille), a great-granddaughter of Jean Baptiste Bernardin and Marie Taillefer.  In it she writes of a son called “Gilles” who:

“secretly answered the call for volunteers of the Army of the United States, possibly recruiting for the 1848 War with Mexico.  Only after he had crossed the frontier was his father notified of his intention to join the American Army and nevermore was any news heard of the fugitive.  Conjecture after conjecture as to Gilles’ whereabouts and doings would burn the anguished minds of the afflicted parents whose grief lasted as long as their life.  Many a time the aged sire, ready to partake of his meal, burst into tears at the thought of his prodigal son and turned away without eating a morsel.”

Another document was a memoir by Marie-Louise Hamel (Mrs. Therrien), granddaughter of  Jean Baptiste Bernardin and Marie Taillefer . It includes this:

“Everything was going well when suddenly Gilles, who had military blood in his veins, decided to go off to war in the United States, and unfortunately, never came back, nor was ever heard from again.  This was an enormous grief for his dear parents.  It aged his father and weighed heavily on the soul of his mother, who often used to say to us: “Dear God, if my Gilles is alive, push him toward us.  If he is dead, let his spirit appear before me and tell me where he is.”  It was really very sad for everyone.”

My first thought on reading these documents was that Gilles must be the missing Charles Jules! The names “Gilles” and “Jules” could easily be confused in an oral interview!

The Professor knew of these stories and investigated whether or not a Gilles Bernardin had become a soldier in the United States.  He concluded that these were just family legends and that no such person existed. Of course, there is much more information available now than when the Professor was doing his research.  Plus, he did not know that he was missing a child!

Searching through Civil War records online (Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System) I discovered that a “Julius Bernarden” was a Private in the Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 47th Regiment.  Using the “United States General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934” at FamilySearch, I also found out that he had applied for an Invalid Pension. With this information I was able to request his pension records, from NARA (U.S. National Archives and Records Administration).

Pension index

It was months before I received all the files….Eureka!  It’s him! “Julius” Bernardin was born in Nicolet, Lower Canada. He enlisted in the Union Army on June 15, 1861, serving as a Private in the Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 47th Regiment.  He was discharged February 16, 1863 at Point Pleasant, Virginia, his discharge certificate being signed by the surgeon in charge of the General Hospital.

Although all the official government documents list him as “Julius”, he signed his name as “Jueles”.

Bernardin Charles Jules b1837 signature

On April 1, 1863, he applied for an Invalid Pension.  In this application he states:

“that at or near a place called Sewell Mountain [West Virginia] in the month of January 1862, he caught a succession of colds, which resulted from exposure while standing on guard duty; which resulted in lung disease.  That he is by occupation a farmer & unable to perform manual labor, which resulted from this lung disease.”

He was granted a pension of $6 per month. On December 15, 1863 he applied for an increase in his pension, stating that:

“ his disability stated in his former declaration has increased so that he has lost his speech & is so disabled by consumption as not to be able to work.”

On April 8, 1864 he was granted an increased pension of $8 per month. His address is given as 57 East Third St., Cincinnati, Ohio, which turns out to have been a boarding house.

And there the records stop.

I was so hoping that the NARA pension records would record a death date, or at least indicate when pension payments stopped, but alas they don’t.  I have not been able, so far, to find a death date, a burial record or a grave.  Given the state of his health, I expect he died in 1864/65.

I don’t know exactly when he left home.  His father, Jean Baptiste, died in 1857, so he had obviously left by then.

Why did he never contact his family back in Quebec?  A question that will never be answered.

Of all the interesting stories I’ve discovered, I must admit I never expected to find a Civil War soldier in our family’s past.

Here’s a chart showing Mémère’s relationship to Charles Jules Bernardin.

Relationship chart