Thomas Hogue, Sr. and Philomene McMillan

Thomas and Philomene

Thomas and Philomene

Thomas Hogue, Sr., sometimes identified as Thomas Hogg, was born in 1840, according to his death certificate. His wife, Philomene McMillan, was born on the 20th of January in 1848. Philomene has a fascinating ancestry that I will be blogging about soon. Thomas and Philomene were married in St. Boniface on the 31st of January in 1865.

After Manitoba became a province in 1870, a census was taken. It shows that Thomas and Philomene were living on  Lot 60 in St. Charles, approximately where Berkley Street is in present day Charleswood, and not far from where I now live!  Thomas’s mother, Marguerite Taylor, was living with them. Philomene’s sister Marguerite is next door with her husband Jean-Baptiste Beauchemin (who served on Louis Riel’s council). Thomas’s brothers Louis, Joseph and Amable all settled on adjacent lots.

This map from the 1874 survey shows the land settled by the Hogues and Beauchemins.

1874 survey image from Photos & Fragments of Charleswood History

1874 survey
image from Photos & Fragments of Charleswood History

This Google map shows the same area today, with Thomas’s land, Lot 60, marked.

Google map

Google map

Shortly after, the federal government introduced “scrip” which was meant to compensate the original Métis settlers for their land. It was in the form of a voucher that could be redeemed for either a land grant or an amount of money. In 1876 Thomas received his Métis scrip entitlement of $160.

Archival Reference: LAC RG 15 v. 1321

Archival Reference: LAC RG 15 v. 1321

I find it interesting that Thomas actually was able to sign his scrip affidavit. When checking the records for his siblings, only his sister Elizabeth was able to sign, all the others simply made their mark on the document.

The Charleswood Historical Society has recently erected new plaques at the site of “The Passage”. The site had been known as “The Passage” because it was shallow and had historically been used by traders and buffalo hunters. Thomas has his name on those plaques!

The Passage plaque erected by Charleswood Historical Society

The Passage
plaque erected by Charleswood Historical Society

history of "The Passage"

history of “The Passage”

Hogues and Beauchemins

Hogues and Beauchemins

In the Hogue family picture, Thomas’s brother Joseph is the elderly gentleman in the centre.  In the Beauchemin picture, Philomene’s sister Marguerite is the woman on the right wearing the plaid shawl.  The man standing in the centre back is Alexander Allard who turns out to be a second cousin of Mémère’s mother Onesime Allard.

In 1882, Thomas was hired by the Assiniboia Council to run the St. Charles Ferry. The ferry had been established in 1870 and ran from Lot 60 across the Assiniboine to where Rouge Road is now. In the Manitoba Free Press of April 19, 1916, an article concerning possible closure of the ferry refers to the site as “Hogue’s landing”. How cool is that!

I’ve been able to discover a few other tidbits about their life.  The June 10, 1880 Manitoba Daily Free Press tells us that Thomas was appointed as one of the pound keepers for Ward 3 of Assiniboia. In 1887 he donated an acre of land for the first school in Charleswood. Civic elections held on December 13, 1887 resulted in Thomas becoming a Councillor in Ward 2 of Assiniboia. Two years later he was nominated as a councillor for Ward 2 in St. Charles, but I have been unable to find out if he won that election.

In the local history book Photos & Fragments of Charleswood History by Len & Verna Van Roon, we find this description:
“There were several families among the Hogues always prominent in deeds requiring daring. Tom Hogue was a famous buffalo runner from the days when Selkirk settlers swept over the plains after the shaggy beasts whose flesh was made into pemmican, the staple food of the early days. He kept many Indian ponies, fleet footed horses whose mate was the wind, and had quite an establishment.”

In 1892 or 93 they moved to La Salle and started farming. In Then to Now: the history of La Salle, Manitoba we find this excerpt:

“Thomas was a great horseman in his day. Neighbors and friends used to tell of his great achievements and of all the tricks he could do on horseback. At full gallop, he would grab the horse’s mane, jump to the ground and up on the horse’s back again. He would throw his hat on the ground, and at full gallop, he would lean over and pick it up again. One day, a neighbour said that he saw him coming home dragging a fox, which he lassoed while riding through the fields.”

Thomas and Philomene had 9 children:
Marguerite Clara Hogue who married Patrick Dumas
Adelaide Hogue who married Octave Gaudry
Elizabeth Hogue who married Modeste Gaudry
Sarah Hogue who married Arthur Girardin
Marie Hogue who married Joseph Larocque
Thomas Hogue (Pépère) who married Emma Girardin (Mémère
Louis Hogue who married Adelina Bourgeois
Joseph Jean Baptiste Amable Hogue who died at age 3
Virginie Hogue who married Napoleon Girardin.
As you can see 3 Hogues married 3 Girardins!

Thomas died May 20, 1924 and Philomene October 4, 1923. They are buried in La Salle.

St. Hyacinthe Roman Catholic Cemetery La Salle, Manitoba

St. Hyacinthe Roman Catholic Cemetery
La Salle, Manitoba

Yes, Philomene is named McMullen, but it really is McMillan, which I will explain when I blog about that line.

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One thought on “Thomas Hogue, Sr. and Philomene McMillan

  1. Thomas Hogue and Philomene McMillan were my Grandmother’s grandparents. Thomas and Philomene’s daughter, Elizabeth, married my great grandfather Modeste Gaudry, Sr. Their daughter, Odile, was my grandmother. Odile was married to Gustave Lagace. The Lagace family moved to Willowbunch, Saskatchewan and then onto Lebret, Saskatchewan. I never knew my Grandpa Lagace. He died in 1940, I was born in 1952. My grandparents had four sons: Emmanuel and Romuald, who both died young. One age 7 the other 21. My grandma Lagace (Odile Gaudry) died at age 84 in 1974. My father, Victor Lagace died at age 61 in 1979 and his brother Paul died in 1983, I believe. I’m finding so many of these ancestral sites so interesting. Thanks so much. Joanne Jarvis nee Lagace, Regina, Saskatchewan. (Email joajar@sasktel.net)

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