The Warren connection

I’m going to go back in time now, and show the fascinating ancestors of Pépère’s mother, Philomene McMillan. In many ways, her ancestry has some of the most interesting stories.

Occasionally the genealogy gods smile down on a researcher,  and that was certainly the case when I started investigating Philomene’s roots. It turns out that her maternal great-great-great grandmother was a woman named Ann Warren. Ann never left Ireland, and I never would have discovered more about her, except for the fact that her brother was Vice Admiral Sir Peter Warren.

Admiral Sir Peter Warren, painted c. 1748-1752, by Thomas Hudson. National Maritime Museum, London, England, from Wikimedia Commons

Admiral Sir Peter Warren, painted c. 1748-1752, by Thomas Hudson. National Maritime Museum, London, England, from Wikimedia Commons

Sir Peter’s life has been well documented and researched; thus I was able to follow that line far, far back in time. It will take several more blog posts to share all the fascinating stories I’ve found.

Sir Peter and Anne were born in Ireland the son and daughter of Michael Warren of Warrenstown, Co. Meath, and Lady Catherine Aylmer. The Aylmer and Warren families were old Anglo-Irish families with important military and political connections. Peter joined the navy in 1716 under the guidance of his uncle Admiral Matthew Aylmer (1st Lord Aylmer, Baron of Balrath, Co. Meath.)

Sir Peter’s naval career sent him to North America and the West Indies. At this time it was common practice for captured ships to be considered a “prize” and the value of the ship and its cargo was distributed amongst those who seized it. Such “prize money” added to Sir Peter’s wealth, and he invested in land, money lending and stocks. In 1731 he married Susannah DeLancey, daughter of a wealthy and influential New York family whose brother James was Chief Justice and Lieutenant Governor of New York.

From 1744 to 1748, England and France were fighting what is known as King George’s War for supremacy on the eastern coast of North America. In 1745 the British, with a fighting force made up of New England soldiers, and a British naval fleet under the command of Sir Peter successfully captured the French fort of Louisbourg on Île Royale, now Cape Breton Island. (If you are interested, you can watch the NFB film Louisbourg under siege online.)

For his efforts at Louisbourg, Peter was made an Admiral. He also served as a British Member of Parliament. He built a mansion on an estate of 300 acres in what is now Greenwich Village, which you can read about here.  His philanthropy included the support of churches and hospitals. He died suddenly in Dublin in 1752. He is buried in Ireland, and his widow commissioned a monument that is in Westminster Abbey.

Here’s the descent from Ann Warren to Pépère:

1-Anne WARREN (-)
+Christopher JOHNSON (-)
2-Ann JOHNSON (-)
+Richard DEASE (-)
3-Dr. John DEASE (1745-1801)
+Jane FRENCH (ca 1754-1802)
4-John Warren DEASE Sr. (1783- 1830)
+Genevieve BEIGNET (1796-1860)
5-Margaret DEASE (1818-1905)
+William MCMILLAN (1806-1903)
6-Philomene MCMILLAN (1848- 1923)
+Thomas HOGUE (1840-20 May 1924)
7-Thomas Joseph HOGUE (1879- 1955)

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The Gaudry families

One of the best things about “doing” genealogy is that you get to make contact with far distant relatives, who often have precious photographs and information you are missing. This recently happened to me when I happened upon a photograph, posted on ancestry.ca, of Pépère’s sister Elizabeth Hogue (not to be confused with his aunt, the “elusive Elizabeth”!) and her husband Modeste Gaudry and their family. It was a picture I had seen before, but only a very faded copy in the La Salle history book Then to Now. The owner of the photograph turned out to be researching the Gaudry line and gave me permission to post it here. We have exchanged a great deal of information and have added to each other’s knowledge of the Hogue and Gaudry families.

Description from Then to Now: the history of La Salle, Manitoba. Back row: Melina, Ulrick, Modeste Jr., Louis, Odile. Middle row: Elizabeth with Jeanne on her knee, Laura, Marie, Elizabeth, Modeste Sr. Front row: Armand, Joseph, Adelard

Description from Then to Now: the history of La Salle, Manitoba. Back row: Melina, Ulrick, Modeste Jr., Louis, Odile. Middle row: Elizabeth with Jeanne on her knee, Laura, Marie, Elizabeth, Modeste Sr. Front row: Armand, Joseph, Adelard

Isn’t this a wonderful picture? Elizabeth looks beautiful, despite having 12 children! The baby on her lap, Jeanne, was born April 17, 1911 so the picture was probably taken in late 1911 or early 1912.

Tragically, the second youngest, Adelard, the boy in front of his father, would die on July 31, 1912 in La Salle, Manitoba. The family moved to Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan and in the month of October 1918, Elizabeth would bury not only her husband Modeste, but also two daughters, Elizabeth and Laura. 1918-1919 were the years of the influenza pandemic, sometimes called the “Spanish flu”,  that killed about 50 million people worldwide.

By the 1921 census, the youngest child, Jeanne, was living with her married sister Melina, and Armand was with his married brother Modeste.  Elizabeth herself was listed as a boarder with one of the Lalonde families.  In 1922 Elizabeth married a widower, Joseph Lanoie. Elizabeth died September 18, 1952 in Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan.

Pepere’s sister Adelaide had married Modeste Gaudry’s brother Octave. Some time before this, I had made contact with a descendant of Adelaide and Octave who had also shared a marvellous photograph with me. It was simply captioned as the families of Modeste and Octave Gaudry, with no particular people identified.

It just so happened that, as I was doing some research at the Centre du patrimoine at the St. Boniface Historical Society this week, I came upon the book Poplar Poles and Wagon Trails, a history of Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan. Sure enough, there was the same picture, but this time with a caption that listed, but did not identify, some of the people in the picture. After spending more time researching the families of both Adelaide/Octave and Elizabeth/Modeste I have been able to “correct” the information in the caption, but alas, still not identify who is who!

Gaudry families
The man in the centre is definitely Octave. On the right is his wife Adelaide Hogue and the one on the left is Modeste’s wife Elizabeth Hogue.

Picture taken in 1916 by Ernest Srigley on Octave Gaudry farm. In random order: Octave Gaudry and wife Adelaide Hogue, and their children: Auxillia Srigley with Abel and Dorothy Leger (Auxillia’s children from her first marriage), Hector Gaudry and wife Inga Hanson,Octave Gaudry Jr. and wife Eva Balaux, Philippe Gaudry and wife Emiliana Dionne, Mary Guillelmine, Willie, Horace (aka Buster) and Raymond. Also in random order: Elizabeth Hogue (wife of Modeste Gaudry), and their children Odile Lagasse (and her boys, Emmanuel and Paul), Melina Gaudry and Eugene Lalonde, Laura Gaudry, Elizabeth Gaudry, Armand Gaudry and Jeanne Gaudry.

Now the Gaudry family is not a direct blood relation to my line, but all of Elizabeth and Adelaide’s children, 21 in total, were cousins of my Dad’s. So, of course the temptation to research more about them is irresistible! Turns out Modeste and Octave came from a large family. Among their siblings was an older brother Andre who worked as a scout and interpreter for the North West Mounted Police in Saskatchewan. This Andre knew Sitting Bull when the Sioux leader came to the region to escape the situation in the United States.

The father of Andre, Modeste and Octave was Amable Gaudry and his father was Andre Gaudry, a mason from Montreal, who worked on the construction of Lower Fort Garry, as did my ancestor Amable Hogue! In fact, another little tidbit of information I discovered this week, was that when Amable Hogue and Marguerite Taylor’s first child, Marie was baptized in St. Boniface in 1832, her godfather was Andre Gaudry!

Connections, connections, connections!

The Hogues of La Salle, Manitoba

October 9th marks my first year “blogiversary”. It’s been an exciting year of research, writing and “meeting” new relatives. Today’s post is about my paternal grandparents, Joseph Thomas Hogue and Marie Emma Girardin.

Thomas had been born on the 26th of February in 1879 in St. Charles, Manitoba. (Coincidentally, 26th of February is also my birthday!) His family moved to La Salle to farm around 1893. Emma was born on the 23rd of June, 1878 in Worcester, Massachusetts.  (I’ll be telling her story later.)  Her family moved to La Salle in 1895.

The 1901 Census of Canada for La Salle shows the Hogues and the Girardins next to each other.

1901; Census Place: Macdonald, Selkirk, Manitoba. Page 9, Family No: 77 Hogue, Family No: 76 Girardin

1901; Census Place: Macdonald, Selkirk, Manitoba. Page 9, Family No: 77 Hogue, Family No: 76 Girardin

Thomas and Emma were married on the 6th of April in 1907. In 1908 Thomas was appointed as a provincial constable for La Salle. They farmed, but they also built a very distinctive-looking house on rue Principale.

Photo courtesy of Louisa Hogue Dawyduk

Photo courtesy of Louisa Hogue Dawyduk

Here’s a picture of Mémère on her 95th birthday with a cake made in the shape of the La Salle house!  How cool is that.

Emma Girardin Hogue on her 95th birthday

Emma Girardin Hogue on her 95th birthday

Here’s a picture of Pépère and his sons.

Left to right: Albert, John, Aime, Tom, Raymond, Joe, Pépère

Left to right: Albert, John, Aime, Tom, Raymond, Joe, Pépère.

The Hogues and Girardins, both having large families, meant there were always lots of cousins around.  Pépère’s brother Louis had nine boys and three girls. Pépère’s sister Elizabeth and her husband Modeste Gaudry raised a family of twelve, before moving to Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan.

Thomas and Emma raised a family of eight.

Joseph (born 24th of November, 1907) married Madge Smith on the 15th of July, 1933. I don’t have a wedding picture of them, but I have this one taken in 1942.

Joe Hogue and Madge Smith

Joe Hogue and Madge Smith

Thomas, my Dad,  (born 22 Aug 1909) married Madeleine Vaillancourt on the 1st of July, 1933.  They eloped!  So no wedding photo, but here’s one of my handsome Dad

Joseph Thomas Modeste Hogue

Joseph Thomas Modeste Hogue

and my beautiful Mom!

Madeleine Vaillancourt Hogue

Madeleine Vaillancourt Hogue

Raymond (born the 2nd of September, 1910) married Jeanne Mailhot on the 1st of July, 1940.

Raymond Hogue and Jeanne Mailhot

Raymond Hogue and Jeanne Mailhot

Aime (born the 30th of January, 1912) married Louise Johns on the 28th of August, 1937. I have no wedding picture for them but I do have a picture of them taken in 1941.

Left to right: Aime (holding his daughter), Louise, Johnny, Jeanne, Raymond

Left to right: Aime (holding his daughter), Louise, Johnny, Jeanne, Raymond

Irene (born the 6th of January 1914) married Maurice Pariseau on the 15th of August, 1938.

Irene Hogue and Maurice Pariseau

Irene Hogue and Maurice Pariseau

John (born the 26th of April, 1917) married Emma Rochon on the 28th of September, 1942.

John Hogue and Emma Rochon

John Hogue and Emma Rochon

Louisa (born the 7th of August 1920) married Bill Dawyduk on the 25th of November, 1949.

Here’s a picture of Louisa and Bill’s wedding. The happy couple are flanked by my Dad and Uncle Joe.

From left to right: Tom, Bill, Louisa, Joe

From left to right: Tom, Bill, Louisa, Joe

Albert (born the 20th of October 1921) married Margaret Harding. Unfortunately I don’t have many pictures of them.

Albert Hogue with sister Louisa

Albert Hogue with sister Louisa

In 1946 Thomas and Emma moved to Vancouver, at the urging of some Gaudry relatives, but returned to Winnipeg in 1948. Mémère was very ill that year, just before I was born, and she used to tell me she had to stay around to meet me!

At one point, Thomas and Emma lived in a rooming house on Hargrave Street in downtown Winnipeg.  The Eaton’s Santa Claus Parade used to go right by the house.  I remember many occasions of joining other cousins to watch it there.

Thomas died on the 5th of February 1955 and is buried in Assumption Cemetery, Chapel Lawn Memorial Garden, Winnipeg.

from the Winnipeg Free Press, February 11, 1955

from the Winnipeg Free Press, February 11, 1955

Funeral card for Thomas Hogue

Funeral card for Thomas Hogue

Gravestone, Assumption Cemetery, Winnipeg, Manitoba

Gravestone, Assumption Cemetery, Winnipeg, Manitoba

Mémère lived to be 101 and died August 28, 1979. I’ll share more of her story in later posts.

An update for “the elusive Elizabeth”

Recently I blogged about my search to find out more about Elizabeth Hogue, daughter of Amable Hogue and Marguerite Taylor (see here).  I have now received her death certificate from North Dakota.

Untitled

Interestingly, it lists her father as having been born in France, and her mother in England!  The informant for this information was her daughter-in-law, Emma Campagna nee Boucher.

Given that Emma herself was a great granddaughter of Amable and Marguerite as shown here,

Amable to Emma Boucher

I have to wonder was Emma herself unaware of her roots, or was this just another case of hiding Metis identity? Unfortunately that was not an uncommon situation.

In 1941 Emma returned to St. Louis, Saskatchewan for a family reunion, according to this newspaper article.

The Bismarck Tribune (Bismarck, North Dakota) · Fri, Aug 29, 1941 · Page 8

The Bismarck Tribune (Bismarck, North Dakota) · Fri, Aug 29, 1941 · Page 8

It seems unlikely that she didn’t know her family history.