The Dease connection, part 3

As I mentioned previously, John Warren Dease, Sr. and Genevieve Beignoit had 5 children. These children were brought up in the Red River Settlement and, through marriage, had many interesting family ties.

Their second child was Mary Anne Dease (1820-1861) who married Thomas Logan, whose half-brother Alexander was mayor of Winnipeg.

Their third child was John Warren Dease, Jr. (1823-1885) who married Angelique McMillan (a half-sister of William McMillan).  John was involved in the buffalo robe trade between Red River and St. Paul.

Their fourth child was Nancy Dease (1825-1903) who married Pierre Gladu (Pierre was a partner with Louis Riel, Sr. in a mill). Nancy and Pierre’s son, William Gladu, married Eulalie Riel, sister of Louis Riel.

In 1857 when Henry Hind, the geologist, took part inan expedition which would assess the agricultural and mineral potential of the northwest” he wrote this about Pierre and Nancy:

“We arrived at Mr. Pierre Gladieux’s house an hour after sunset on the evening of September the 29th. We were soon provided with an excellent supper, and our horses, seven in number, well supplied with hay in the yard. Before starting next morning an almost sumptuous breakfast was given to us.”

In Hind’s report, published as Narrative of the Canadian Red River exploring expedition of 1857, and of the Assiniboine and Saskatchewan exploring expedition of 1858, there is a sketch done by John Arnot Fleming showing the view from their property.

at-pierre-gladus

The Red River at Pierre Gladieux’s

John and Genevieve’s youngest child was William Dease, Sr. (1827-1913), who married Marguerite Genthon. William was a well-known person in Red River. Gerhard J. Ens, in his essay “Prologue to the Red River Resistance: Preliminal Politics and the Triumph of Riel” published in the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association, Vol. 5, No. 1, 1994, notes:

“The couple and their large family lived and farmed in both St. Vital and St. Norbert. By 1869 Dease was a prominent French-Métis trader and farmer, and member of the Council of Assiniboia. An indication of Dease’s close connection to the various native communities around Red River was his fluency in French, English, Ojibwa, and Sioux.”

Ens argues in his essay that, in the weeks leading up to the Red River Resistance, Dease advocated an approach that focused on aboriginal/Metis rights, rather than Riel’s approach that, supported by Catholic clergy, was more about maintaining French and Catholic rights.

Riel ended up assuming leadership of the Resistance. It is interesting to note that William’s brothers-in-law, Thomas Logan and Pierre Gladu, also opposed Riel.

William eventually, moved to North Dakota, but on a visit back to Winnipeg an interview was published in The Manitoba Free Press on June 20, 1908. Here’s the headline:

Dease headline 1908

Despite some inaccuracies (his grandfather married Jane French, but she wasn’t from France!), it is an interesting read. Here’s an excerpt:

“It is difficult to get Mr. Dease to speak about himself and the part he took in the troublesome times of 1869 and 1870. The old native of Rupert’s Land is very unassuming and modest, and Mr. Dease is no exception. Without my own forty years experience in the country, it would have been impossible to extract from him what follows which I may preface by saying that like all the Anglo-French of his day and generation he is a man of physical perfection and great stature. The name of his uncle Chief Factor Peter Warren Dease is well-known as an Arctic explorer. His grandfather owned estates in Ireland and there married a French lady. On his way from what is now British Columbia and Oregon to take charge at Fort Garry his father, John Warren Dease died, leaving his wife, Jeanie Benoit, a young family of five who were brought up in the Red River settlement.”

Our direct ancestor is John and Genevieve’s first child, Margaret Dease, born 1820, or perhaps 1818.

Library and Archives Canada MIKAN no. 1502741

Library and Archives Canada MIKAN no. 1502741

Margaret married William McMillan, and it is the McMillan connection I’ll explore in my next post.

For the record, here is Pépère’s descent from Richard Dease:

1-Richard DEASE (?-?)
+Ann JOHNSON (?-?)
2-Dr. John DEASE (1745- 1801)
+Jane FRENCH (ca 1754- 1802)
3-John Warren DEASE Sr. (1783-1830)
+Genevieve BEIGNET/BEIGNOIT (1796-1860)
4-Margaret DEASE (1818-1905)
+William MCMILLAN (1806- 1903)
5-Philomene MCMILLAN (1848-1923)
+Thomas HOGUE (1840-1924)
6-Thomas Joseph HOGUE (1879-1955)

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