July 1, 1867

Today is Canada Day! It is 148 years since Canada East, Canada West, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia united to become the Dominion of Canada.

FATHERS OF CONFEDERATION IN LONDON / From the original painting by J.D. Kelly Credit: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. R1300-360

FATHERS OF CONFEDERATION IN LONDON / From the original painting by J.D. Kelly
Credit: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. R1300-360

 

Now, none of our Hogue and Girardin ancestors had anything to do with Confederation! However, I was inspired by a very interesting and educational program that ran in the 1950s on CBS, hosted by the noted journalist Walter Cronkite, called YOU ARE THERE. It featured re-enactments of pivotal events in history, as if they were happening in the present, and included reporters interviewing the major characters. Every episode ended with the tagline

“What kind of a day was it? A day like all days, filled with those events that alter and illuminate our times. And you were there.”

You are there

I thought it would be interesting to document which of my Dad’s direct ancestors were alive on July 1, 1867. Turns out there were 15 of them.

Here they are with their ages and place of residence on that momentous day.

On the Hogue side:

Josephte Belisle, about 82 (lots of confusion about her birth date). Living in St. Charles, in the Red River Settlement, near or with her son William.

William McMillan, age 61, married to Margaret Dease, about 49 years old, living on the banks of the Assiniboine River, on what is now called the St. James side.

Thomas Hogue, Sr., 26 years old, married to Philomene McMillan, 19 years old, living on the banks of the Assiniboine River, Lot 60 St. Charles in the Red River Settlement.

Marguerite Taylor, about 62, living in Red River Settlement with family, possibly Thomas and Philomene, as she is with them in the 1870 Census.

On the Girardin side:

Charlotte Taillefer, age 69, widowed, living in Warwick, Canada East.

Paul Girardin, age 62, married to Louise Bernardin, age 42. They were either still in Kingsey, Canada East, or may have already moved to Worcester Massachusetts.

Napoleon Girardin, age 16, and living with his parents in either Kingsey or Worcester.

Joseph Pierre Allard, age 41, married to Marie Bonin, age 39, living in St. Hyacinthe, Canada East.

Jean Baptiste Bonin, age 68, married to Marie Amable Dupre, age 66, living in St. Ours, Richelieu, Canada East.

Onesime Allard, age 15, living with her parents in St. Hyacinthe.

Happy Canada Day everyone!

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3 thoughts on “July 1, 1867

  1. Very cool idea. And seeing how your family is involved in so much of Canadian history, I am surprised that none of them we at Confederation meetings – must have ben an oversight.

  2. Well, here I am, cycling down a London street, 148 years on, when I pass a woman with two little sparkly Canadian flags on her head and wearing a maple leaf t-shirt. I yell out Happy Canada Day, as I whizz by, and she repeats it in a very Canadian accent. Our own little London commemoration – eh 🙂

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