John Francis Grant, part 2

I’m continuing the story of the relationship between John Francis Grant and the Hogue, Bernardin, and Girardin families.

On page 285 of A Son of The Fur Trade, Johnny says:

“In the spring of 1881 my son Richard got married to a Miss Hogue and took his wife to the Ranch.”

This refers to Rosalie Hogue, daughter of Joseph Hogue and Pelagie Turcotte.

Hogue Rosalie

Picture posted with permission of Anita Steele from her website at http://william-grant-of-trois-rivieres-genealogy.ca/photos-grant.html

Rosalie was Pépère’s first cousin as shown below.

Rosalie to Pepere

Richard Grant was the son of Johnny and Louise Serpante, a Shoshone woman. He was born in Montana in 1857, and was the brother of Mary Agnes Grant whom I profiled in a previous post.

Richard Grant and Rosalie Hogue were married in 1881, and had 10 children. They lived first in Manitoba, where three of their young daughters died. By the 1901 Census they were in Edmonton. In the 1916 Census, Richard’s occupation was listed as foreman with HBC. I can track Richard until 1944 in Henderson’s Edmonton Directories, and Rosalie until 1940 in the federal Voters Lists. I have not been able to determine when they died, or where they are buried.

One of their sons “Buck” Grant, was a professional hockey player. You can read about him here.

The fourth, and last connection, is with Angelique Welsh, who gave birth to a daughter, Cecile, with John Francis Grant. From Anita Steele’s website we learn:

“Cecile’s mother was Angelique  Welsh, the daughter of half-breed parents, Francois Xavier Welsh and Charlotte Suvin or Sauve. Angelique was born May 27, 1841, at St. Boniface. Angelique met John F. Grant when he visited Manitoba looking for a better place to move his large family to from Montana. … In 1881 … John F. Grant, made a sworn statement before the Metis Infant Lands Commissioner in Manitoba confirming he was Cecile’s father.”

Here’s the connection. Marguerite Hogue (sister to Rosalie mentioned above, and first cousin of Pépère) was the second wife of Angelique’s brother, Norbert Welsh. Norbert’s story is told in The Last Buffalo Hunter.

It’s not a strong connection to our family, but nonetheless an interesting one, and it illustrates once again how interconnected the families of the Red River Settlement were.

 

John Francis Grant, part 1

A few years ago I picked up the book A Son of the fur trade: The Memoirs of Johnny Grant, edited by Gerhard J. Ens, with genealogical charts by Anita Steele.

I read the book simply because I am interested in fur trade history, but was delighted to find four family connections! The book is an oral history, dictated to his wife before he died in Edmonton, Alberta in 1907. You can read a review of the book here.

John Francis Grant was a very colourful character. He was born at Fort Edmonton to HBC clerk Richard Grant (later to become a Chief Trader) and Marie Anne Breland, but raised in Trois-Rivières by his paternal grandmother after the death of his mother. As Anita Steele explains on her excellent website William Grant of Trois Rivieres:

Johnny Grant -as he was known in the U.S.- remained in the U.S. for twenty years. During that time, he was one of Montana’s earliest settlers, a trader, a cattle and horse rancher, owner of a store, a saloon, a dance hall, a grist mill and a blacksmith shop. His enterprises took him west and south as far as Fort Vancouver, WA,, and Sacrament, CA; and as far east, south and north as St. Louis, MO, Trois Rivieres, PQ, and the Red River Settlement of MB, and to many locations between.

Johnny’s Montana ranch is now a National Historic Site. You can read more about the ranch here.

John F. Grant had several wives and many children. After selling his Montana ranch in 1866 he brought his family to Red River. He established a ranch near present day Carman, Manitoba, as well as a home on the banks of Sturgeon Creek. There is a historical mural in Carman that includes Johnny Grant and his wife Clotilde Bruneau. You can see it here.

So what is our connection to John Francis Grant? It’s that three of John’s children married into the Hogue, Dease and Bernardin families.

In A Son of the fur trade there are references to these marriages. On page 234, Johnny reminisces about having a party in 1870:

As usual, we sent invitations to all the elites of Winnipeg and nearly every one of the two parishes that were fit to invite and some outsiders. We had sixty-two couples besides the family and that was twelve counting my son-in-law, William Dease. That was quite a few for a country dance, but they were all welcome and everyone enjoyed themselves thoroughly. We had a jolly good time. We dance[d] in three rooms, three and more violins going at the same time, all the liquor they wanted of different kinds. But I am proud to say not one was worst of liquor and the table, well you can imagine. I had plenty of money those days and we were not stingy.”

The William Dease referred to is William Dease Jr., son of William Dease, Sr. whom I wrote about here. William Dease Jr. married John’s daughter, Mary Agnes Grant, whose mother was Louise Serpante, a Shoshone woman. Mary Agnes was born in 1851 and she married William in 1869.

Here’s a chart showing the relationship to Pépère.

Dease chart
William and Mary Agnes did not have any children, but they appear to have led an adventurous life! They lived in Red River, Dakota, Montana, Oregon, and California. From the Montana Historical Society I obtained a biographical sketch, and copies of two letters William wrote to his father.

 

Biographical sketch by A.E. Dease, William Dease papers, 1876-1886, SC 612, Folder 1, Montana Historical Society Research Center, Archives

Biographical sketch by A.E. Dease, William Dease papers, 1876-1886, SC 612, Folder 1, Montana Historical Society Research Center, Archives

 

Transcript of letter, December 4, 1876, William Dease papers, 1876-1886, SC 612, Folder 1, Montana Historical Society Research Center, Archives

Transcript of letter, December 4, 1876, William Dease papers, 1876-1886, SC 612, Folder 1, Montana Historical Society Research Center, Archives

 

Transcript of letter, June 19, 1886, William Dease papers, 1876-1886, SC 612, Folder 1, Montana Historical Society Research Center, Archives

Transcript of letter, June 19, 1886, William Dease papers, 1876-1886, SC 612, Folder 1, Montana Historical Society Research Center, Archives

I have been unable to find out exactly when or where William and Mary Agnes died.

As I mentioned, John Francis Grant had a ranch near present day Carman, Manitoba, the same time the Girardin and Bernardin families were homesteading there. This leads to our second family connection. On page 274 of the book we learn:

Among the French families that had come from the states, there was one who had rather a grown up family: 3 sons, big enough to work, and three daughters. My son Billy was often at the Ranch that winter. There was attraction out there [between him and] the oldest of the girls. The consequence was that in June of 1878 their Wedding was coming on.
She was a good girl. If he had searched the country over he could not have found a better person better suited to him. She was so patient.’

The family he is talking about is that of Joseph Bernardin and his wife Marie Peloquin. The daughter is Oxilia. And Billy is William Grant, born in 1856 to John Francis Grant and Quarra, another Shoshone woman. Here’s a chart showing the relationship between Oxilia and Mémère:

Bernardin chart

On Anita Steele’s website there is this photograph.

Grant pic

Labels on the back of this tintype were not totally clear, but have been analyzed as:
(R) Billy Grant, son of John F. Grant
(C) First name: Louis. Surname looks like Bernasdene. Perhaps Bernardin(e)
(L) First name: Napolian. Surname looks like Geradine. Perhaps Germain(e)

It seems quite likely that the Louis in the picture is Oxilia’s brother Louis Bernardin, making him brother-in-law to William Grant.

And it also seems likely that the Napoleon is Oxilia’s cousin Napoleon Girardin, Mémère’s father.

Here’s a side by side comparison of Napoleon’s wedding picture from 1873 with the picture above.

Napoleon 1

Napoleon 2

 

 

 

And here’s a comparison of a picture of a picture of Louis Bernardin taken from the book Treasures of Time: The Rural Municipality of Cartier 1914-1984, with the picture above.

Louis 1

Louis 2

 

 

 

 

Tragically, William and Oxilia’s marriage was a short one, as William died in 1886. They had at least two daughters, and perhaps one son. The only child I’ve been able to track is Anna Grant, who married Edouard Roy. Co-incidentally, Edouard was the widower of Eva Rheault, whose mother was Marie Rouleau whose second marriage was to Napoleon Girardin.  Are we confused yet?

I don’t know where William Grant is buried, but Oxilia is buried in Holy Sacrament Cemetery in Elie, Manitoba, near her father Joseph.

Grant Oxilia obit

Oxiliagrave

 

I’ll continue writing about the Grant connections in my next post.

Remembrance Day 2015

In honour of Remembrance Day, I’ve decided to post some more about my Dad, Thomas Hogue, and his time in the R.C.A.F. (Royal Canadian Air Force). Dad, a welder with Canadian National Railways, spent time at the No. 1 Technical Training School in St. Thomas, Ontario, where the R.C.A.F. trained ground crews as part of an initiative known as the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. St. Thomas is in southwestern Ontario.

Google map showing St. Thomas, Ontario

Google map showing St. Thomas, Ontario

The Technical Training School was established in 1939. It was housed in what had originally been the brand new Ontario Psychiatric Hospital. When war broke out, the patients were transferred to other hospitals, and the complex acquired to train R.C.A.F. ground crews. There’s a great aerial photo of the buildings here from the Elgin County Archives.

Here’s a historical plaque commemorating the School.

Photograph by Alan L. Brown, Courtesy of ontarioplaques.com

Photograph by Alan L. Brown, Courtesy of ontarioplaques.com

Dad’s service in the RCAF began November 1, 1940. I have an old, torn letter of reference from his CNR supervisor, dated February 14, 1940.

Reference letter from CNR

Reference letter from CNR

I’m not sure how long Dad was in St. Thomas, but my Mom and two brothers lived there for awhile, and my third brother was born there in 1941. Here’s a newspaper article that talks about St. Thomas during World War II.

The Ottawa Journal, Fri, Jun 18, 1943, Page 2, accessed on Newspapers.com

The Ottawa Journal, Fri, June 18, 1943, Page 2, accessed on Newspapers.com

And here are some pictures of Dad and his workmates on the grounds of the facility.

Thomas Hogue at St. Thomas

Thomas Hogue at St. Thomas

 

RCAF Training School, St. Thomas, Ontario

RCAF Training School, St. Thomas, Ontario

Once he was finished in St. Thomas, Dad was posted back to Winnipeg, and worked at #8 Repair Depot. This was located at the airport in Winnipeg, which was then known as Stevenson Field.  From the website of the Winnipeg Richardson International Airport I found out:

In 1936, a major development took place that gave Winnipeg’s airport a dramatic impetus to growth. An act of Parliament created Trans-Canada Air Lines (TCA). Winnipeg was chosen to be its operating headquarters for the new, national airline…

Soon after TCA became fully operational, the Second World War brought another surge of activity. The airport mushroomed into a mini-city. The field was suddenly host to dozens of new buildings, hundreds of planes and thousands of workers. RCAF training schools, overhaul shops, TCA’s main operating base and executive offices, and the airplane manufacturing facilities of Midwest Aircraft and MacDonalds all appeared almost at once.

A news item in The Winnipeg Tribune, Thursday, July 4, 1940, announced that the construction contract for the repair depot was awarded to Bird construction Co.

“The repair depot will consist of about 23 buildings, including seven hangar repair shops each 112×128 feet, a headquarters building, quarters and mess buildings for officers, N.C.O.’s and men, and numerous other smaller structures.  Exact cost could not be learned, but it is in the neighborhood of $450,000.”

So that’s where Dad spent his war years. Here’s a picture from our family photo album, clearly showing the TCA signage.

Stevenson Field

Stevenson Field

And here’s a picture of Dad and an unidentified co-worker, standing next to a plane, presumably one they worked on.  Dad is on the right.

Thomas Hogue on right, at St. Thomas Training School

Thomas Hogue on right, at St. Thomas Training School

Like most people, now that Dad is gone, I wish I knew more about that time in his life.  After the war, he went back to working for CNR, from which he retired in 1970.

July 1, 1867

Today is Canada Day! It is 148 years since Canada East, Canada West, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia united to become the Dominion of Canada.

FATHERS OF CONFEDERATION IN LONDON / From the original painting by J.D. Kelly Credit: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. R1300-360

FATHERS OF CONFEDERATION IN LONDON / From the original painting by J.D. Kelly
Credit: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. R1300-360

 

Now, none of our Hogue and Girardin ancestors had anything to do with Confederation! However, I was inspired by a very interesting and educational program that ran in the 1950s on CBS, hosted by the noted journalist Walter Cronkite, called YOU ARE THERE. It featured re-enactments of pivotal events in history, as if they were happening in the present, and included reporters interviewing the major characters. Every episode ended with the tagline

“What kind of a day was it? A day like all days, filled with those events that alter and illuminate our times. And you were there.”

You are there

I thought it would be interesting to document which of my Dad’s direct ancestors were alive on July 1, 1867. Turns out there were 15 of them.

Here they are with their ages and place of residence on that momentous day.

On the Hogue side:

Josephte Belisle, about 82 (lots of confusion about her birth date). Living in St. Charles, in the Red River Settlement, near or with her son William.

William McMillan, age 61, married to Margaret Dease, about 49 years old, living on the banks of the Assiniboine River, on what is now called the St. James side.

Thomas Hogue, Sr., 26 years old, married to Philomene McMillan, 19 years old, living on the banks of the Assiniboine River, Lot 60 St. Charles in the Red River Settlement.

Marguerite Taylor, about 62, living in Red River Settlement with family, possibly Thomas and Philomene, as she is with them in the 1870 Census.

On the Girardin side:

Charlotte Taillefer, age 69, widowed, living in Warwick, Canada East.

Paul Girardin, age 62, married to Louise Bernardin, age 42. They were either still in Kingsey, Canada East, or may have already moved to Worcester Massachusetts.

Napoleon Girardin, age 16, and living with his parents in either Kingsey or Worcester.

Joseph Pierre Allard, age 41, married to Marie Bonin, age 39, living in St. Hyacinthe, Canada East.

Jean Baptiste Bonin, age 68, married to Marie Amable Dupre, age 66, living in St. Ours, Richelieu, Canada East.

Onesime Allard, age 15, living with her parents in St. Hyacinthe.

Happy Canada Day everyone!

More obituaries

Did I mention how much I enjoy finding newspaper articles and old obituaries?  I recently subscribed to Newspapers.com, which includes, among other publications, The Winnipeg Tribune.  Turns out that some obits I couldn’t find in The Winnipeg Free Press, are in the Trib!

I have found four more obituaries for Philomene’s siblings.

For Marguerite, who married Baptiste Beauchemin, this obituary was published in The Winnipeg Tribune, Tuesday, December 14, 1926, on the front page:

Marguerite McMillan obituary

Marguerite McMillan obituary

For Philomene’s sister Marie Anne who married Salomon Carriere, this obituary was published in The Winnipeg Tribune on June 16, 1922, page 6:

Obituary of Mary Ann McMillan

Obituary of Mary Ann McMillan

For Philomene’s sister Virginie, who married Daniel Carriere, this obituary was published in The Winnipeg Tribune September 5, 1993, page 13:

Obituary of Virginie McMillan

Obituary of Virginie McMillan

For Philomene’s sister Elizabeth, who married Pierre Bruce, this obituary was published in The Winnipeg Tribune, Wednesday, May 18, 1938, page 6

Elizabeth McMillan obituary

Elizabeth McMillan obituary

Sadly, still no obituaries for Philomene, or her sister Sara.

The McMillan/Dease Family

Today I’m going to write about the children of our Hogue ancestors, William McMillan and Margaret Dease. They had nine children who survived to adulthood.  Gaps in the birth order would suggest there were other infants born who did not survive. I’ve already written about Philomene McMillan, who married Thomas Hogue, Sr. here.

Thomas and Philomene

Thomas and Philomene

When examining the families of these siblings, we see, once again,  how interconnected the people of the Red River Settlement were.

Philomene’s sister, Marguerite McMillan (1840 – 1926) was born in St. Boniface. She married Baptiste Beauchemin and they lived next door to Philomene and Thomas on the banks of the Assiniboine River in St. Charles. Baptiste Beauchemin was a member of Louis Riel’s Provisional Government.

A very interesting article appeared in The Winnipeg Tribune, April 10, 1946, when Marguerite and Baptiste’s son William died.

The Winnipeg Tribune, April 10, 1946

The Winnipeg Tribune, April 10, 1946

Wow!  Actually saw the shooting of Thomas Scott, a pivotal event in Manitoba history.

Marie Anne McMillan(1842-1922) married Salomon Carriere. They eventually settled in St. Laurent, Manitoba.

Joseph McMillan (1849-1923) married Pauline Bruce. I love finding obituaries!  Even though they often contain slightly inaccurate information, they do give us a glimpse into the lives and times of our relatives. I was able to find an obituary for Joseph. (Philomene died the day before her brother, but I’ve never found an obiturary for her.)

MANITOBA FREE PRESS, WINNIPEG, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1923
JOSEPH M’MILLAN WAS PIONEER IN FARMING
St. James Resident Who Died Yesterday Was Prominent in Assiniboia
Western Canada lost another pioneer farmer in the death of Joseph McMillan, a native of St. Boniface, who died yesterday morning at his residence, 241 Maddock street, St. James, at the age of 73 years. Born in the Cathedral city, Dec. 4, 1849, Mr. McMillan crossed the river 60 years ago, and settled in St. James on what is now known as the Strathmillan estate, where he farmed for a number of years and had lived ever since.
After several years of active life in the municipality of Assiniboia, where he was elected to the council the first year of its existence and later presided over its deliberations as reeve, Mr. McMillan retired from the public life of the district in 1912.
Mrs. McMillan pre-deceased him, having died in September, 1922. He leaves two sons and four daughters, being W.F. McMillan of Poplar Point; J.E. McMillan, 240 Maddock street; Mrs. L.T. Hogue, Murray Park; Mrs. D. Lagasee, of St. Adolphe; Mrs. Charles Sayer, of Delmas, Sask., and Miss Catherine McMillan, at home.
In addition to being a pioneer of the west, Mr. McMillan had the further distinction of being the son of a native of western Canada, his father having been born in Edmonton, of Scottish descent. In the early days of his settling in St. James he taught school at Sturgeon Creek.
Up to Thursday afternoon, this pioneer was talking to his sons of the olden days, with their buffalo hunts and other exciting adventures, though he had been bedridden for the past eight months following a paralytic stroke.
The funeral will be held Monday, at 9:30 a.m., from the family residence, interment taking place at St. Charles cemetery.

Buffalo hunts!  Those certainly would qualify as “exciting adventures”!

Virginie McMillan (1851-1933) married Daniel Carriere, a cousin of Salomon’s. (Both Daniel and Salomon were also cousins of Damase Carriere who was involved with the Riel Rebellion of 1885, and died at Batoche, Saskatchewan.) Virginie and Daniel lived in St. Eustache, Manitoba.

Sarah McMillan, (1852-1943), was married three times. She married Joseph Turcotte, was widowed, married Pierre Jobin, was widowed, and then married Antoine Vandal. Sarah is buried in St. Jean Baptiste, Manitoba. (Pierre Jobin’s brother Ambroise died in 1885 from wounds suffered at the Battle of Batoche.)

Patrice “Patrick” McMillan, (1854-1929) married Elizabeth “Betsy” Caplette. I also found an obituary for him.

Manitoba Free Press, Winnipeg, Friday, December 13, 1929
PIONEER RESIDENT OF WINNIPEG DIES
Patrick McMillan Succumbs at St. Giles, Man., Aged 74 Years
Patrick McMillan, aged 74 years, and pioneer resident of Winnipeg, died Tuesday at his home at St. Giles, Man. He was born in St. Boniface, and resided on Davidson street, St. James until a few months ago, when he moved to St. Giles. In addition to his widow, Mr. McMillan is survived by two sons, W.J. of St. Charles, and Peter, of St. James; also three daughters, Mrs. N. Lane, of Deerhorn, Man.; Mrs. H. Breland of St. Francis, Man., and Mrs. A. Turcotte, of Charleswood, Man.
Funeral service for Mr. McMillan will be held this morning at 10 o’clock at St. Charles church, and burial will be made in St. Charles cemetery. The Clark-Leatherdale funeral home is in charge of arrangements.

John McMillan (1858-1908) married Virginie Bruce, sister to Pauline. John also has an obituary.

MANITOBA FREE PRESS, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1908
John McMillan, of St. Charles, died at the family residence on Monday night, after a protracted illness. He was born at St. Boniface in 1860, removing to St. Charles when a young lad. He was a son of the late Joseph McMillan, [this is an error and should read William]an official in the service of the Hudson’s Bay company, who lived to be over 100 years old, his death taking place five years ago. John McMillan was well known, and highly respected by all with whom he came in contact, and was always ready to take an active interest in matters of general benefit to the community where he lived. He leaves a widow and five children: Alan, Josephine and Virginia, at home; Mrs. Alexander Smith, of St. James, and Mrs. Lacceet, of St. Vital. He was a keen sportsmen, having formed one of a party of five, consisting of A. Smith, H. Roberts, W. Pruden, G. Kerr, and the deceased, who went on an annual hunting expedition together for the last thirteen years. The funeral will take place this morning at 8:30 from the family residence to St. Charles cemetery, where interment will take place.

St. Charles Cemetery Winnipeg, Manitoba

St. Charles Cemetery
Winnipeg, Manitoba

Elizabeth McMillan (1859-1938) married Pierre Bruce, brother of Pauline and Virginie.  They lived in St. Laurent, Manitoba.  I’ve found an obituary for Pierre.

MANITOBA FREE PRESS, WINNIPEG, TUESDAY, APRIL 19, 1927, page 5
TWO AGED RESIDENTS OF ST. LAURENT DIE
Pierre Bruce, Aged 78 Years, and Pierre Lavelle, Aged 70 Called By Death

St. Laurent, Man., April 18.—Pierre Bruce, aged 78 years, died yesterday morning at the family ranch at Harperville, after a protracted illness. He was a native of St. Norbert, and resided in the neighborhood of Winnipeg for the first fifty years of his life. Mr. Bruce was an artist with the violin, and only a few years ago gave a demonstration of his skill, playing reels and jigs at the then “Pantages theatre.”
He is survived by his widow, two daughters and four sons.
The funeral will be held at St. Laurent on Tuesday.

All three Bruce in laws were nieces/nephews of John Bruce, who was President of the Métis National Council in 1869.

The family name “McMillan” was sometimes spelt “McMullen”. In 1878, Joseph McMillan must have petitioned HBC for acknowledgment of the correct spelling. In the HBC Archives, MG8 B53, we find this letter:

“Fort Garry 24th Dec 1878
I hereby certify an examination of old Hudson’s Bay Company record, that the family name of McMillan (say Father of William McMillan and Grandfather of Joseph McMillan) is spelt McMillan not McMullan.
J.H. McTavish
Chief Factor H.B.C.”