Oops…July 18th

I should never prepare a post first thing in the morning and post it right away.  Sigh.

Last Sunday, July 16th, I posted about how it was my brother’s birthday AND the anniversary of my Dad’s death.

I was wrong.  I realized it mere minutes after I clicked on Publish.  However, email followers received the message right away, before I recognized the error and deleted the post.

Mea culpa.  Here’s the correct post.

If my brother Don was still alive, he would be celebrating his 80th birthday today, July 18th.  Sadly he died in January.

Last Sunday, July 16th,  marked the 45th anniversary of my father’s death.

Here’s a picture of Don, Mom, and Dad at Niagara Falls.  I’m pretty sure this was the summer of 1970.

Niagara Falls

Don, Madeleine, Tom

Happy times.  Miss you all.

For all the Fathers and Grandfathers

I had many lovely comments on my Mother’s Day post of pictures, so I thought I would do the same thing for Father’s Day.

My maternal grandfather was George Vaillancourt.  He was born in Trois-Rivières, Quebec. He was married twice. His first wife died leaving him with a one-year old son.  He then married my grandmother, Marie Anne Girard.  They lived in Trois-Rivières, in Trochu, Alberta, and in Regina, Saskatchewan, before settling in Manitoba. He died long before my brothers and I were born, at the age of 65, and is supposedly buried in St. Anne’s, Manitoba, although I haven’t yet found a grave.

Vailancourt George

George Vaillancourt 1869-1935

 

On my paternal side, the oldest picture I have is of Allan “Glenpean” McMillan, my fourth great grandfather.  Born in Scotland, he was instrumental in bringing settlers to Ontario, in what was know as the Lochaber Emigration. I wrote about him here.  He died at the age of  71 and is buried in St. Andrews United Church Cemetery in Williamstown, Ontario.

McMillan Allan

Allan “Glenpean” McMillan 1752-1823

 

My third great grandfather was James McMillan, also born in Scotland, who came to Canada with his family. I wrote about him here.  His country wife was Josephte Belisle, my ancestor. He died back in Glasgow, Scotland at the age of 75.  I don’t have a picture of him, but I do have this picture of his statue at Fort Langley, British Columbia, courtesy of Joan Sanderson.

McMillan James b1782

James McMillan 1782-1858

 

My second great grandfather was William McMillan.  He was born near present day Edmonton and  eventually moved to the Red River Settlement where he married Margaret Dease.  He was a  very interesting man whom I wrote about here.  His obituary claimed he was 103, but I’m sure that’s not true.  He is buried in St. Charles Cemetery, Winnipeg.

McMillan William

William McMillan 1806-1903

 

My great grandfather was Thomas Hogue. He was the son of Amable Hogue, whom I wrote about here. (Sadly I don’t have a picture.)  He married Philomene McMillan and lived in St. Charles before moving to La Salle, Manitoba around 1893.  I wrote about him here. He died at the age of 83, and is buried in the St. Hyacinthe Cemetery in La Salle.

Hogue Thomas Sr.

Thomas Hogue Sr. 1840-1924

 

My other great grandfather was Napoleon Girardin. Napoleon was born in Kingsey, Quebec and emigrated to Worcester, Massachusetts, where he married Onesime Allard.  They eventually emigrated to Manitoba, and Napoleon settled in La Salle, after the untimely death of Onesime. At the age of 71 he married again.  I wrote about him here. He died, aged 78 and is buried in an unmarked grave in La Salle.

Girardin Napoleon

Napoleon Girardin 1851-1929

 

My grandfather was Thomas Joseph Hogue. He was born in St. Charles, moved to La Salle with his parents, and was the first constable of the village. He was married to Emma Girardin.  They are, of course, the Pépère and Mémère of my blog posts! I wrote about him here. He died at the age of 75 and is buried in Assumption Cemetery, Winnipeg.

Hogue Thomas Jr.

Thomas Joseph Hogue 1879-1955

 

And then my father, Joseph Thomas Hogue. He was born in La Salle, but eventually moved to Winnipeg.  A welder by trade, he died much too soon after retirement. He died just before his 63rd birthday, and is buried in Assumption Cemetery, Winnipeg.

Hogue Thomas b1909

Joseph Thomas Hogue 1909-1972

 

Still miss you Dad!

Remembrance Day 2015

In honour of Remembrance Day, I’ve decided to post some more about my Dad, Thomas Hogue, and his time in the R.C.A.F. (Royal Canadian Air Force). Dad, a welder with Canadian National Railways, spent time at the No. 1 Technical Training School in St. Thomas, Ontario, where the R.C.A.F. trained ground crews as part of an initiative known as the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. St. Thomas is in southwestern Ontario.

Google map showing St. Thomas, Ontario

Google map showing St. Thomas, Ontario

The Technical Training School was established in 1939. It was housed in what had originally been the brand new Ontario Psychiatric Hospital. When war broke out, the patients were transferred to other hospitals, and the complex acquired to train R.C.A.F. ground crews. There’s a great aerial photo of the buildings here from the Elgin County Archives.

Here’s a historical plaque commemorating the School.

Photograph by Alan L. Brown, Courtesy of ontarioplaques.com

Photograph by Alan L. Brown, Courtesy of ontarioplaques.com

Dad’s service in the RCAF began November 1, 1940. I have an old, torn letter of reference from his CNR supervisor, dated February 14, 1940.

Reference letter from CNR

Reference letter from CNR

I’m not sure how long Dad was in St. Thomas, but my Mom and two brothers lived there for awhile, and my third brother was born there in 1941. Here’s a newspaper article that talks about St. Thomas during World War II.

The Ottawa Journal, Fri, Jun 18, 1943, Page 2, accessed on Newspapers.com

The Ottawa Journal, Fri, June 18, 1943, Page 2, accessed on Newspapers.com

And here are some pictures of Dad and his workmates on the grounds of the facility.

Thomas Hogue at St. Thomas

Thomas Hogue at St. Thomas

 

RCAF Training School, St. Thomas, Ontario

RCAF Training School, St. Thomas, Ontario

Once he was finished in St. Thomas, Dad was posted back to Winnipeg, and worked at #8 Repair Depot. This was located at the airport in Winnipeg, which was then known as Stevenson Field.  From the website of the Winnipeg Richardson International Airport I found out:

In 1936, a major development took place that gave Winnipeg’s airport a dramatic impetus to growth. An act of Parliament created Trans-Canada Air Lines (TCA). Winnipeg was chosen to be its operating headquarters for the new, national airline…

Soon after TCA became fully operational, the Second World War brought another surge of activity. The airport mushroomed into a mini-city. The field was suddenly host to dozens of new buildings, hundreds of planes and thousands of workers. RCAF training schools, overhaul shops, TCA’s main operating base and executive offices, and the airplane manufacturing facilities of Midwest Aircraft and MacDonalds all appeared almost at once.

A news item in The Winnipeg Tribune, Thursday, July 4, 1940, announced that the construction contract for the repair depot was awarded to Bird construction Co.

“The repair depot will consist of about 23 buildings, including seven hangar repair shops each 112×128 feet, a headquarters building, quarters and mess buildings for officers, N.C.O.’s and men, and numerous other smaller structures.  Exact cost could not be learned, but it is in the neighborhood of $450,000.”

So that’s where Dad spent his war years. Here’s a picture from our family photo album, clearly showing the TCA signage.

Stevenson Field

Stevenson Field

And here’s a picture of Dad and an unidentified co-worker, standing next to a plane, presumably one they worked on.  Dad is on the right.

Thomas Hogue on right, at St. Thomas Training School

Thomas Hogue on right, at St. Thomas Training School

Like most people, now that Dad is gone, I wish I knew more about that time in his life.  After the war, he went back to working for CNR, from which he retired in 1970.